Agenda

June 1st 2017

AALS lecture by Professor Paul Silverstein (Reed College) on 'Moroccan Coalminers, Ethno-Religious Revival, and the Fate of Cosmopolitan Europe'.

Date: Wednesday 21 June, 2017

Time: 15:30-17:00 (with drinks afterwards)

Location: HG 02A24 (main building of the VU)

Abstract: This lecture explores the history and internal tensions of a cosmopolitan vision of Europe through the lens of the coalmining industry in northern Europe and its post-war recruitment of laborers from (mostly Berber-speaking) Morocco who joined those from Italy, Poland, Greece and elsewhere in complexly intertwined communities. Mining, as opposed to atomized factory or construction labor in which earlier North African migrants worked, necessitated solidarity and inter-dependence across ethnic or national affiliations, both in the workplace and in the labor union activism that developed across Europe. The lecture interrogates the fate of such solidarity in the wake of the mine closures in the 1980s. While many of the miners’ descendants are today active in various kinds of Islamic revivalism and Berber/Amazigh cultural movements, the legacy of this earlier political engagement is still alive for many who, from their current predicament of post-industrial economic precarity, regard such working-class solidarity from a nostalgic perspective. The lecture thus considers the place of embodied labor in contemporary top-down and bottom-up projections of European identity.

_Streep

21 June 2017

AALS lecture by Professor Paul Silverstein (Reed College) on 'Moroccan Coalminers, Ethno-Religious Revival, and the Fate of Cosmopolitan Europe'.

Date: Wednesday 21 June, 2017

Time: 15:30-17:00 (with drinks afterwards)

Location: HG 02A24 (main building of the VU)

Abstract: This lecture explores the history and internal tensions of a cosmopolitan vision of Europe through the lens of the coalmining industry in northern Europe and its post-war recruitment of laborers from (mostly Berber-speaking) Morocco who joined those from Italy, Poland, Greece and elsewhere in complexly intertwined communities. Mining, as opposed to atomized factory or construction labor in which earlier North African migrants worked, necessitated solidarity and inter-dependence across ethnic or national affiliations, both in the workplace and in the labor union activism that developed across Europe. The lecture interrogates the fate of such solidarity in the wake of the mine closures in the 1980s. While many of the miners’ descendants are today active in various kinds of Islamic revivalism and Berber/Amazigh cultural movements, the legacy of this earlier political engagement is still alive for many who, from their current predicament of post-industrial economic precarity, regard such working-class solidarity from a nostalgic perspective. The lecture thus considers the place of embodied labor in contemporary top-down and bottom-up projections of European identity.

_Streep