Seminars and events organised by the Anthropology of Children and Youth Network

Upcoming seminars



14 June 2016

Dear all,

It is our pleasure to invite you to the 7 year anniversary of the EASA Anthropology of Children and Youth Network.
We celebrate this occasion in a festive seminar on Tuesday 14 June 11.30-13.00 at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.
Click here to view the poster

With kind regards,
Sandra Evers
Anne Schouten
Quinta Schutte
Moos Pozzo

 

Past seminars of the Anthropology of Children and Youth Network

 

 EASA


15 April 2016

The seminar is on Friday 15 April 10.30-12.00 (W&N Building, 6th floor, room WN-P656, this is behind the main building):

Observing early childhood parenting across the globe
By Judi Mesman, Professor of Diversity in parenting and development, Scientific Director of the Institute of Education and Child Studies, Centre for Child and Family Studies, Leiden University

 

Abstract: Many theoretical frameworks about parent-child interactions are based almost entirely on research in Western urban populations. One of the goals of the research program ‘Diversity in parenting’ is to examine the universality versus culture-specificity of assumptions from the Western scientific parenting literature with regard to non-Western populations, using standardized video observations. This work has recently become part of a network of researchers using video data on child development across the globe, who have joined forces to facilitate the multidisciplinary analyses of video materials. In this presentation Judi Mesman will discuss studies from the Diversity in Parenting program, as well as the collaboration arising from this new network (see also: www.diversityinparenting.nl )

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15 March 2016

Dear All,

It is our pleasure to invite you to the Anthropology of Children and Youth Seminar.

The seminar is on Tuesday 15 March 10.30-12.00
(Initium, 6th floor, room IN-2B59, this is left behind the main building):

Hearing and Seeing: Xikrin (Brazil) ways of knowing and the schooling system.

Clarice Cohn, a Professor at Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil, has been researching among the Xikrin since 1992, and is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Nanterre, Paris.

Departing from extensive ethnographic work among the Xikrin of Bacaja, Clarice Cohn shows how this Indigenous group from the Brazilian Amazonia values the abilities of hearing and seeing as ways of knowing and acquiring knowledge. She explores how these senses are developed by children and problematizes the process of formal schooling which these children are also attending. She details how and why formal education can be at odds with indigenous conceptions and practices of teaching and learning. Accordingly Clarice Cohn will elaborate on how indigenous and formal education requirements can be reconciled and where the challenges can be pinpointed.

Note that our April meeting will take place on Friday 15 April 10.30-12.00.
If you are interested in presenting at one of our seminars yourself, please contact the Network chair: Dr Sandra J.T.M. Evers, s.j.t.m.evers@vu.nl
VU University is located at a 10-minutes’ walk from Amsterdam Zuid railway station. Tram stop ‘De Boelelaan / VU’ is served by tram lines 5 and 51.
Feel free to communicate information of this seminar to other people who might be interested.

Could you confirm your participation in the 15 March seminar to us? childrenseminar@hotmail.com
We are looking forward to an inspiring meeting!

Kind regards,

Sandra Evers
Moos Pozzo
Anne Schouten
Nathalie Pijnaker

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19 February 2016

Dear All,
It is our pleasure to invite you to the Anthropology of Children and Youth Seminar.

The seminar is on Friday 19 February 10.30-12.00 (W&N building, 6th floor, room WN-P656, this is behind the main building. C.):
(Download map VU-building)
 

Cartographies of Child Poverty in Policies and Programmes in Kenya: Locating Children's Voice at the Interstices of Competing Representations

Elizabeth Ngutuku (Eliza)

PhD Researcher
International Institute of Social Studies

 

Abstract:

Policies and programmes for child poverty and vulnerability harbour specific constructions on child poverty as well as poor children. These constructions may affect children’s subjective experiences and elide the voices of children. Despite this possibility, these interventions have often been perceived as natural and the norms they harbour are often invisible. The proposed one year research in Kenya intends to problematize and denaturalize these dominant constructions as embedded in policies and programmes. Elizabeth Ngutuku will map these competing representations against the perspectives and lived experience of children. In so doing, she intends to locate children’s voices, while aware that these perspectives might go beyond the articulated as they might be contained in the unsaid as well as hidden in the processes of silencing.

Note that our March meeting will take place on Tuesday 15 March 10.30-12.00. We will have the pleasure of a presentation of Dr Clarice Cohen from Brazil.

If you are interested in presenting at one of our seminars yourself, please contact the Network chair: Dr Sandra J.T.M. Evers, s.j.t.m.evers@vu.nl

VU University is located at a 10-minutes’ walk from Amsterdam Zuid railway station. Tram stop ‘De Boelelaan / VU’ is served by tram lines 5 and 51.

Feel free to communicate information of this seminar to other people who might be interested.

Could you confirm your participation in the 19 February seminar to us?

childrenseminar@hotmail.com

We are looking forward to an inspiring meeting!

Kind regards,

Sandra Evers
Moos Pozzo
Anne Schouten
Nathalie Pijnaker

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15 January 2016

Dear All,

It is our pleasure to invite you to the EASA Anthropology of Children and Youth Seminar.
The seminar is on Friday 15 January 10.30-12.00 in room BV-0H54 (blue block behind the main building of VU University Amsterdam)

 

The Value of Transcultural Family/System Therapy in Child and Youth Care
Dirck van Bekkum & Judith Limahelu (see below for professional bio)


Abstract

Rarely anthropology and family therapy met but when they do research, educational and clinical innovation can be achieved. In their interactive presentation, Van Bekkum and Limahelu will discuss three of these innovations in co-educating transcultural family therapists. They concern: (1) Transgenerational Cultural Diversity and Intersectionality; (2) A transitional model in multicultural settings; (3) Systemic reflexivity in research, activism and clinical practices. Children and youth (including their generational networks) are at the core of these approaches. After short 'vignette' presentations of these three innovations, the presenters will answer questions and exchange views with the audience.

Please find further details here.
If you are interested in presenting at one of our seminars yourself, please contact the Network chair: Dr Sandra J.T.M. Evers, s.j.t.m.evers@vu.nl
Feel free to communicate information of this seminar to other people who might be interested.

Could you confirm your participation in the 15 January seminar to us? childrenseminar@hotmail.com
We are looking forward to an inspiring meeting!
We wish you all the best for 2016.


Kind regards,

Sandra Evers
Moos Pozzo, Anne Schouten, Nathalie Pijnaker
  

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Dear EASA Network members,

With this message we would like to thank you for another vibrant year of our Network. We enjoyed very inspiring presentations and discussions in our monthly seminars, collaborations of Network members led to new research, policy advice and improvement of ethical guidelines for work with children and youth. We also saw the publications of innovative studies of Network members.
We welcome you to share your news with us so we can further strengthen our internal and external dissemination of our work.
For your convenience we have already determined the dates for the upcoming seminars in 2016:

 
· Friday 15 January 10.30-12.00;
· Friday 19 February 10.30-12.00;
· Friday 18 March 10.30-12.00;
· Friday 15 April 10.30-1200.
· The dates for the May and June seminar will be determined in the new year.

     

If you are interested in presenting at one of our seminars yourself, please contact the Network chair: Dr Sandra J.T.M. Evers, s.j.t.m.evers@vu.nl
We hope to see you at the seminars.
In the meantime, we wish you a special Christmas season and all the best for 2016.

  

Kind regards,

Sandra Evers
Moos Pozzo
Anne Schouten
Quinta Schutte

 

 - for past seminars, see below.

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18 December 2015

 

Does the harmonious society in 'Paradise Island' Mauritius exist?

Nathalie Pijnaker, BA student in Social and Cultural Anthropology (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

 

Nathalie Pijnaker spent three months among Mauritian students from different backgrounds and different religious beliefs. Mauritius is an immigrant island without a native population. Ancestors of the Mauritians come from Africa, Madagascar, India, Europe and Asia. According to the travel guides, the population of Mauritius lives together in peace and harmony. But in what way do they live and interact with each other in everyday life and what about their sense of Mauritianness? During the seminar, Nathalie will give an insight into her fieldwork results and methodological experiences working with Mauritian students.

Could you confirm your participation in the 18 December seminar to us? childrenseminar@hotmail.com

If you are interested in presenting at one of our seminars yourself, pleas contact the Network chair: Dr. Sandra J.T.M. Evers, s.j.t.m.evers@vu.nl

VU University is located at a 10-minutes' walk from Amsterdam Zuid railway station. Tram stop 'De Boelelaan / VU' is served by tram lines 5 and 51.

Feel free to communicate information of this seminar to other people who might be interested.

 

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19 November 2015

 

Time to Look at Girls:Migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia

Marina de Regt, Assistant Professor, Vrije Universiteit - Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology

 

As part of the research project 'Time to Look at Girls: Adolescent girls migration and development' a documentary film was made. The film explores the circumstances, decision-making, experiences and consequences of migration for adolescent girls in Bangladesh and Ethiopia. The film is based on four parallel stories about the migration trajectories of adolescent girls. Breaking away from the dominant focus on girls as victims of trafficking, this film gives evidence of the resilience, creativity and agency of young migrant girls who face difficult choices. As one of the lead researchers of the research project, Marina de Regt was closely involved in the making of the documentary in Ethiopia. She will introduce the film and share her experiences of the production process and talk about the reception of the film in Ethiopia, where it had its premiere in October 2015.

The seminar takes place from is on 13.30 - 15.00 in room M-648 (W&N Building, note that this is a new location).

Could you confirm your participation in the 19 November seminar to us?

childrenseminar@hotmail.com

 

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13 October 2015

 
Individual abilities embedded in social processes: children’s empathy.

Simone Roerig – Department of Educational Neuroscience (LEARN!), Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam & Dr. Floryt van Wesel – Department of Methodology and Statistics, Utrecht University.

In (neuro-)psychological and neuro-scientific research, empathy is often approached as an individual ability, whereas researchers in the social sciences (in particular anthropology) focus on empathy as a dialectic process between two (or more) people. In our study we work as an interdisciplinary research team combining and comparing these theoretical frameworks within the context of a mixed methods study. Preliminary results suggest that the contextual information as collected on the daily life level, is crucial to understand when, how and why children’s abilities go social.

The seminar takes place from is on 10.00 - 11.30 in room HG-01G13 (Main Building, note that this is a new location).

 

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18 September 2015

How to Survive a Residence Permit? Integration Assessments of Young Refugees (aged 12-23) in the Netherlands Through the Lens of Code-Switching

Moos Pozzo, PhD Candidate, VU University Amsterdam

Despite the increasing restrictions in European and Dutch national asylum policies during recent decades, the number of young refugees are growing rapidly. Research on the lived experiences of their integration processes is primordial and timely. The proposed research focuses on the role of linguistic and cultural code-switching, defined by Molinsky as "the act of switching from one language to another" and "the task of moving between culturally ingrained systems of behavior". This study analyses the young refugees' mediation processes and code-switching in their social networks and how this influences their integration processes. The aim is to delineate the personal and societal variables that enhance and/or hamper the emergence of cultural navigators' who succeed in mediating varied cultural anchorings and position themselves in hybrid ways.

This seminar takes place from 10.30 - 12.00 in room HG-02A32, Main Building, VU University Amsterdam

Download the poster of this seminar.

 

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16 June 2015

Implementing Needs and Interest of Adolescent Girls in Nicaragua into Sexuality Educational Programs

Yoah Kerkvliet, Research Master Student of Indernational Development Studies, UvA Amsterdam

 

The content of adolescent sexuality educational programs are based on theoretical models that each identify different factors that shape sexual behavior in order to change risk into non-risk sexual behavior. Hereby, aiming to reduce negative health outcomes, such as Sexual Transmitted Diseases or pregnancy, Previous literature has revealed that the content components in sexuality educational programs that are deemed necessary by program designers are not assessed in the same way by adolescents. Thereby, dialing to meet the needs and interests of adolescents and being less effective. This research attempts to include the perceptions of adolescents girls in the barrio of the Pantanal in Granada (Nicaragua) to understand which factors they consider of importance in shaping sexual behavior and behavioral change, namely domestic workers and sex workers, and among parents and peers.

This seminar takes place from 13.30 - 15.00 in room Z-113, Metropolitan Building, VU.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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19 May 2015

Time to look at girls: Adolescents girls' migration and development in Ethiopia

Marina de Regt, Assistant Professor in Anthropology, VU University Amsterdam

 

In the past decade an increasing number of Ethiopian girls have migrated from villages and rural towns to Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa. In the literature he migration of adolescent girls is mainly described in the context of trafficking and exploitation. Little is known about the experiences, life choices, and aspirations of these girls. This research project focuses on the life course and in particular on the way in which the decision to migrate intersects with other important choices, such as those related to education, marriage and having children. The research is part of a larger project which also includes studies in Bangladesh and Sudan. In Ethiopia data was collected among two groups of adolescent migrant girls in Addis Ababa, namely domestic workers and sex workers, and among parents and peers.

 

The seminar takes place from 10.30 - 12.00 in room Z-009, Metropolitan Building, VU.

 

Download the poster of this seminar.

 

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14 April 2015

Toxic But Intoxicating: Towards a critical and comparative medical anthropology of inhalant use in Mexico City, Delhi and Aboriginal Australia

Roy Gigengack, Research Fellow VU University Amsterdam

 

Inhalant use - the delicate inhalation of volatile substances with purposes of intoxication - affects the lives of tens of thousands of young people around the globe. Despite massive presence in the streets, it remains a poorly understood form of drug use. Existing policy frameworks are narrowly biomedical and tend to individualize harm. Forming part of a broader project investigating inhalant use and intervention in Mexico, India and Australia, the study proposed here aims at establishing a comparative, meaning-centered, and critical medical anthropology for inhalant use.

 

The seminar takes place from 10.30 - 12.00 in room Z-009, Metropolitan Building, VU.

 

Download the poster of this seminar.

 

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17 March 2015
Children and land grabs: Development, social reproduction and the future in a nature park in Senegal
Davide Cirillo, University of Padova & VU University Amsterdam

Since 2008, the sharp raise of commodity prices resulted in an energy and food crisis, and pressure on market supply chains. International organizations reacted by placing agriculture, both for energy and food production, at the centre of their political agendas. The resulting development model is one that insists on private capital investment to fuel production on ‘underexploited’ and ‘potential arable’ land. Thus, in recent years a new wave of large-scale land acquisitions by states, companies, investment and pension funds, is reshaping rural territories globally. Impacts on peasant and indigenous populations are yet to be fully measured. In this talk I present an overview of my research on territorial transformations induced by a foreign company’s private lease of a natural reserve in Senegal. I focus on current and future impacts on children and youth. Indeed, young people are crucial agents in social reproduction and I argue that they need specific attention, particularly since their futures are at stake

The seminar takes place from 10:30-12:00 in room Z-009, Metropolitan Building, VU.

Download the poster of this seminar.

 

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16 January 2015
Infant male circumcision: Should the practice be regulated?
Barbora Palesova, King's College London

The current review of the medical- and rights-based implications of infant male circumcision provides a partial justification for the decision of the Cologne district court and other recent European initiatives to ban or regulate the practice. It is argued that the procedure is only justifiable in the presence of a medical indication. It is further argued that the parental preferences and their rights alone should not be legally sufficient to provide a consent to remove a healthy tissue from a newborn's body. Instead, the potential harm and medically unnecessary nature of the procedure make the right to bodily integrity, and other rights enshrined in core human rights documents central arguments in favour of regulating MC, making it safer, painless, and a matter of the concerned child's (or becoming adult's) fully informed consent. Barbora Palesova will present her work and the audience will be invited to participate in a group discussion.

The seminar takes place from 10:30-12:00 in room Z-113, Metropolitan Building, VU.

Download the poster of this seminar.

 

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 15 December 2014

Documentary ‘Play no matter what!’ and the concept of Social Circus
Kim van Haaster, director and producer of documentaries at Kim van Haaster Audiovisuele Producties

Kim van Haaster will introduce the concept of Social Circus that is closely related to the topic of the documentary ‘Play no matter what!’. The documentary was shot in Romania in 2013. After the screening there is time for questions.

Synopsis
Rachitoasa is the hilly hometown of Alexandra and Noni, two Romanian teenagers at the age of fourteen. There is not much else to do in Rachitoasa but to go school, work the land, help out in the household, or hang out on the streets. But one glorious day a bunch of funny looking, foreign people come to live in their village and stay a while. They turn the abandoned and rundown school building down the road into a colorful place for them to play! Ash and Jolien and the two teenagers become friends and hand-in-hand they play and figure out what they are good at and what is valuable in life. Playing is the most powerful way of learning, no matter the circumstances.

(54 min. Romanian & English spoken. English subtitles.)

Download the poster of this seminar.

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 14 November 2014

Moving across languages and learning traditions
Leslie C. Moore, associate professor of Teaching & Learning and Linguistics at The Ohio State University, and Fulbright Scholar at Universiteit Utrecht

In this talk I present an overview of my research on the social and cultural patterning of children's language learning in communities whose members use multiple languages and participate in multiple language traditions. I examine such patterning in three multilingual African communities. Fist, I discuss language learning and use in a village in the Mandara Mountains, identifying several features of social life that worked together to reproduce and reinforce norms of multilingualism. Second, I examine Fulbe children's socialization into Fulfulde, Arabic, and French across secular, religious, and domestic activity settings. Third, I discuss Somali-American children's experiences of language learning and double schooling (participation in Qu'ranic and public schooling). In studying African children's experiences and developmental trajectories as learners and users of multiple languages across contexts, I seek to expand and deepen our understanding of how everyday practices shape language learning in culturally distinctive ways that may be transformed over time and space.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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16 October 2014
Researching and reporting on human trafficking with a particular focus on the trafficking of minors
Ieke de Vries, researcher at the office of the Dutch National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children

There is increasing awareness of human trafficking in the Netherlands and at the international level. To tackle a hidden problem such as human trafficking, it must be made visible. A complicating matter is that human trafficking can take different forms, it can occur for different reasons, and individual trackers as well as criminal organization may be involved. The way governments or non-governmental organizations assess the criminal component also determines what measures will be taken to combat it. And even though there is more awareness, questions remain like: What is the role of researchers (both quantitative and qualitative) studying human trafficking and how do they contribute to the question of visibility? By means of concrete examples on human trafficking - with a focus on the trafficking of minors, the seminar will look into the various ways for researching the phenomenon.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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15 September 2014
‘M-Nationalism? Mobile phones, youth, digital capitalism and belonging in rural Southeast Asia’
Roy Huijsmans, senior lecturer Children & Youth Studies, ISS, The Hague, The Netherlands

Mobile phone use has become a defining feature of what it means to be young. This is no less true in the relatively remote, ethnic minority spaces of the Lao-Vietnamese borderland area that is the focus of this study. Drawing on Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities, I investigate the interplay between mobile phones, being young and digital capitalism and how this reconfigures belonging. In doing so, I focus on ethnic minority youth's appropriation of the mobile services provided by Viettel, the most popular mobile service provider in the study area and owned by the Vietnamese Ministry of Defence. I argue that the nationalism embedded in the digital capitalism of the corporate dimension of the post-socialist state (i.e. Viettel) enters young people's lives and transforms ethnic minority spaces in profound ways and that a re-reading of Anderson's work in the digital age offers new ground for understanding the formation of nationalism in a distinct generational fashion.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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16 June 2014
'Generationing' development: Furthering the conversation'
Lidewyde Berckmoes, Sandra Evers, Shanti George, Roy Huijsmans, Sharada Srinivasan, Ben White

This seminar will take the form of a roundtable discussion about a recent Special Issue (2014; 26(2)) publication of the European Journal of Development Studies entitled ‘Generationing Development: Situating children and youth in development processes’. The publication takes issue with the categorising approach towards children and youth that predominates in development studies, policy and practice. Instead, the contributing papers employ a relational understanding of children and youth in development and tease out how processes of development are oftentimes distinctly generationed dynamics. In this seminar, the guest-editors will briefly introduce the central premises of the publication, and some contributing authors will critically reflect on how these ideas have informed their article as well as the scope and limitations of the idea of ‘generationing’ development.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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19 May 2014
Human trafficking is happening here in the Netherlands
Corinne Dettmeijer-Vermeulen, Dutch National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children

Recent years have made clear that people can be exploited in many ways and in many places. In prostitution, but elsewhere as well, such as the agricultural and horticultural sectors, and the catering industry. Not long ago a conviction was handed down for the exploitation of street newspaper vendors.
Human traffickers take advantage of people who are often in a weak position or they use violence to coerce others to work for them. Crimes like these demand vigorous response. Human trafficking is a complex phenomenon. We can only succeed in tackling the problem if society at large and government agencies are aware of this and together take a firm stance. A robust response has been mobilised in the past few years. However, the battle against human trafficking is never won. The effort to fight I remains our challenge for the years ahead.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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17 April 2014
Child circulation in and from China: An ethnographic account on the unpredicted consequences of the introduction of the Transnational Adoptive Program
Dr. Júlia Vich Bertran, MACIMIDE postdoctoral fellow, Maastricht University

This presentation unveils the ways in which macro-level factors such as national and transnational political and economic regimes, and global cultural discourses on child protection brought by the introduction of a Transnational Adoptive Program (CTAP) transform, redescribe and reproduce traditional practices of child circulation, altering the lives of certain types of children and generating stratified unequal paths to provide children for adoption to locals and foreigners. This Chinese case is based on two uninterrupted years of fieldwork in a Chinese central province.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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14 March 2014
A review of early-years childcare services aiming to explore the state of Children's Rights in the Netherlands
Olga Middendorp, alumna Institute of Education, University of London

This seminar explores how decisions about childcare are made at different levels in the Netherlands. The focus is on how this influenced and impacts family lives and especially the rights of babies of approximately three months old (when the maternity leave ends). The ongoing debate about how the care of young children should be arranged is explored in this research. From an Euro-American viewpoint a substantial body of literature in the field of development psychology is anchored in the presumption that throughout hominid evolution mothers were exclusively responsible for nurturing offspring. This viewpoint underestimates the substantial joint effort it requires to rear healthy human children. Cross-cultural studies underscore the fact that multiple carers (next to parents and family) are a common feature in many societies and that this pattern of childcare appears to work. But nowdays, the benefits of this pattern is questioned in many Western societies and institutionalized childcare services do not facilitate it.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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14 February 2014
Elusive tactics: Urban youth navigating the aftermath of war in Burundi
PhD defense of Lidewyde H. Berckmoes, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, VU University Amsterdam

The dissertation, based on fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork research, explores the social genesis of war and peace in Burundi. The topic is approached through a focus on everyday practices of classification and identification among youths (16-30 years) on the northern periphery of Bujumbura. It reveals the ways in which male and female youths in marginalized circumstances grapple with insecurities and uncertain prospects concerning violence and exclusion, which characterize Burundi in the aftermath of the civil war. Therewith, the study gives insight into purposive action in indeterminate contexts and illuminates the agency of ‘ordinary people’ – here, youths – in reinventing peace. Among others, it argues that some of the prevalent practices in Burundi can be termed ‘elusive tactics’. Elusive tactics refer to practices that allow people to remain or become more versatile, flexible and, quite literally, difficult to pin down. They foster the desire for or belief in openness and alternatives, beyond the knowledge and power that constrain everyday life. Yet, they also perpetuate and foster mistrustful social relations: extraordinary circumstances and betrayal remain a looming possibility.

Download the poster of this seminar. 

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17 January 2014
Child-focused corporate social responsibility: built-in or bolted-on?
Implementing the Children’s Rights and Business Principles in Nairobi, Kenya
Lauren Schuivens, Research Master student in International Development Studies, University of Amsterdam

Many studies on children’s rights emphasise the need to see children as stakeholders. In a comprehensive approach to children’s rights studies, however, both the rights-holders and the duty-bearers should be included. Given the under-researched area of business people as duty-bearers to respect and support children’s rights, UNICEF, UN Global Compact and Save the Children created the Children’s Rights and Business Principles (CRBP) initiative. Launched in March 2012, this initiative is meant to serve as inspiration and guidance for all types of businesses in their interactions with children. This research focuses on Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya, and aims at understanding how business people’s perceptions and motivations regarding child-focused Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) relate to their child-focused CSR practices and to the CRBP. Since NGOs are currently pushing businesses to implement these Principles in their policies and operations, this research also aims to explore what role NGOs can play in facilitating the implementation of child-focused CSR and the CRBP.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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16 December 2013
Childhood and ‘illegality’ in migrant Malaysia
Catherine Allerton, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science

This presentation is about the children of Filipino and Indonesian migrants living in the city of Kota Kinabalu in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. It describes the ways in which ‘illegality’, as a socio-political construction, shapes children’s daily experiences, as well as their perspectives on both Malaysian society and their parents’ country of origin. More broadly, Catherine Allerton examines how ‘illegality’ and ‘childhood’ are mutually constructed in Sabah, where citizenship and education are denied to ‘foreign’ children.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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15 November 2013
Self and other at home and at school: children with a migration background in Dutch education
Anna van der Meulen, PhD student, Department of Educational Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Specific groups of children, such as children with a Moroccan-Dutch and Turkish-Dutch background, are known to perform in general less well in Dutch education, both in comparison with Dutch peers and with peers with a different migration background. One possible explanation for this complex problem is that these children experience strong differences between their home and school environment when it comes to values and habits in social interactions. This explanation is being studied using both experimental tasks that mimic these social interactions, and more qualitative measures that aim to gain insight in the way the children experience their home and school environment and culture.

Download the poster of this seminar. 

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14 October 2013
Life in a Syrian refugee camp in Kurdistan Northern Iraq: Developing education for children out of school
Cilel Smith, Senior lecturer, University of Northampton
Andy Somers, Executive head teacher, Hartsdown Academy

The majority of the approximately 2 million Syrian refugees in neighbouring countries are children. This presentation offers a ‘snapshot’ of the Syrian refugee children’s experiences, their journey, life and education in the camp in Kurdistan Northern Iraq. It discusses the importance of structure and a form of ‘normality’ in a world of chaos. Smith and Somers will offer insights into their experiences and the complexities of setting up a Kurdistan registered school in the Domiz camp.  They recruited and trained 95 Syrian refugee teachers while using the My New School board game as a tool for closing the gap in learning for children out of school. The presentation will include video footage of the camp, interviews with teachers, families and children and a presentation of the photographs that children took of their life in a refugee camp.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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16 September 2013
Re-thinking education in a world with HIV and AIDS:A qualitative inquiry into HIV- and AIDS-related education in Mozambique.
Esther Miedema, PhD candidate, Institute of Education, University of London

Broad consensus exists as to the importance of HIV- and AIDS-related education in efforts to decrease young people’s vulnerability to the epidemic. However, as demonstrated by continuing debate regarding necessary contents and teaching approaches, there is less agreement as to what particular form HIV- and AIDS-related education should take. This study engages with a critical gap in the literature, namely the general lack of clarity regarding the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of HIV- and AIDS-related education. It is argued that such clarification is essential to efforts to understand and, where necessary, challenge assumptions underpinning HIV- and AIDS- related education initiatives and address possible tensions between programme development in principle and in situ implementation.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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14 June 2013
"The country we are supposed to be": born free South Africans talk about their nation"
Saskia Welschen, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam

When apartheid ended in South Africa in 1994, a key challenge was the development of a national identity among an extremely divided population. Mandela and other key figures set the tone by promoting an image of South Africa as a ‘Rainbow Nation’: a nation united in its diversity. The ‘born free generation’ − raised in a free democratic society − would live out that ideal. At the same time, South African society is marked by tensions that exemplify the complexities of social transformation: persistent socio-economic inequality, ongoing racial segregation, and exceptionally high levels of violence. How then do South Africans of the ‘born free generation’ make sense of their national identity against the backdrop of these processes?  Saskia Welschen examined the identity talk of young South Africans in five secondary schools in KwaZulu-Natal. Her study contributes to our insight in what it means to be a young South African today.

Download the poster of this seminar.

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17 May 2013
Uneasy Welcome: Immigrant and Refugee Newcomers in Nebraska
Jenelle Reeves & Stephanie Wessels, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Like other ‘fly-over’ states located in the center of the U.S., Nebraska is a no-coast, agricultural state experiencing demographic shift.  Nebraska’s unique situation as a Latino receiving state and a refugee resettlement area has had deep impact on the state’s identity, educational institutions, family and civic life.  In this presentation, Jenelle Reeves and Stephanie Wessels overview Nebraska’s immigration situation and share some of their research particularly related to immigrant youth, schooling, and teacher preparation.  Dr. Reeves will share a teacher preparation initiative for teaching immigrant youth in elementary and secondary schools.  Dr. Wessels will share her work with Latino families (parents and school-age youth) involved in a family literacy project. 

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12 April 2013
Media, Youth and Morality
Professor Elly Konijn, Department of Communication Science

The omnipresence of (social) media in today´s youth livelihood raises important questions as to how continuous media availability and use may affect them. One of those questions concerns the role contemporary media may have in affecting youngsters´ moral development, particularly in view of antisocial media content and phenomena like cyber bullying. I will present some of our latest research findings as collected among a large number of adolescents from the perspective of media psychology. In my presentation, I will apply an open format to discuss various theoretical and methodological approaches.  

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11 March 2013
Culturing Neuroscience: doing research in the borderland between anthropology and neuro-psychology
Eva Malkus & Simone Roerig, VU University Amsterdam

In their work Malkus and Roerig bring these disciplines together in a way that opens new opportunities in child-oriented social research. Eva Malkus focuses on migrant children and youth in the Netherlands and their navigation between the school and home setting. She analyses both personal and contextual variables that influence these processes, as well as the influence of their navigation abilities on their functioning at cognitive, social and schooling levels. Simone Roerig aims at conducting research on children's empathic processes. She uses both quantitative and qualitative methods through which various elements of empathy are mapped. Moreover she looks into the relations between children's empathic abilities and their daily social and cultural practices.

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11 Februari 2013
Cultural Navigation and Participation in Dutch Society
Sara ter Beeke & Moos Pozzo,
Master Students Social and Cultural Anthropology, VU University Amsterdam

Migrant Children in the Netherlands: Navigating Through Cultural Worlds (research of Sara ter Beeke)
It is often stated that migrant youth, due to their cultural background, lack the skills to participate in Dutch society. However, when perceiving these children as ‘professionals’ of living in a multicultural neighbourhood (having intercultural interactions on a daily basis), it becomes apparent these children possess rich cultural competences. Currently, Sara is conducting fieldwork in Amsterdam New-West, using creative ethnographic methods (theatre).

The Paradoxes of Participation, Rights and Access of Individual Asylum Seekers between the Ages of 12 and 23 in the Netherlands (research of Moos Pozzo)
What does participation mean when you are a young asylum seeker? How do your perceptions and practices relate to your rights, and, at the same time, to your limited access to society? Moos is conducting her fieldwork with youth in an asylum centre in order to discover their perceptions and practices of participation in leisure activities (art, music, sports, etc.), the youth council in the centre, friendships, families, communities, and Dutch society.

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14 January 2013
The Role of Children in Linguistics
Robert Cirillo, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

Linguistics is a fairly young science, having gone through a sort of revolution in the 1950s. It consists of the three core theoretical areas of syntax, phonology/phonetics and semantics, but language is of course embedded in a historical, social and biological setting. This has inevitably led to the fascinating fields of historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, neurolinguistics and psycholinguistics. In all areas of linguistic research, children play a major role. This lecture will begin with a brief introduction to language and linguistics and will then offer an overview of some of the main areas of research involving children, particularly language acquisition, bilinguality and creolization. It will be shown that the uncontrollable creativity of children is what gives vitality to language.

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14 December 2012
Continuities, conflicts and ruptures: Confronting inequality in gender relations, corporal and emotional practices among the Basque youth
Margaret Bullen, Carmen Diez, Mari Luz Esteban, and Jone Miren Hernández, University of the Basque Country

In the presentation we will discuss the preliminary conclusions of our project on gender relations between young Basque women and men with regard to inequality. We have researched various contexts of young people’s realities: study and working environments; friendships and emotional relationships; family and experiences of motherhood/fatherhood; ritual practice and leisure. Emphasis is placed on the study of corporal and emotional practices as privileged areas of analysis through which the social structure, collective and individual action are articulated.
In our effort to detect the pulse of change in young Basques’ gendered experiences, we ask what changes and what stays the same, what areas of young people’s lives produce conflict and what solutions and  strategies are employed to break with perceived inequalities.

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29 November 2012 
“And a child shall lead us”: the dynamic role of the young in the late modern world
Jim Block, Professor of Political Science, DePaul University, Chicago

Jim Block, drawing on his study of the role of the young in American modernization in his 2012 book The Crucible of Consent: American Child Rearing and the Forging of Liberal Society (Harvard University Press, 2012), will discuss the powerful role of the young in creating American society. As Western European and then North American societies experienced the dynamic of modernization in the early modern period, they found traditional institutions, patterns of authority and hierarchy, and forms of social identity and place eroding and in the American case swept away. The young, less tied to traditional expectations and less limited by traditional constraints, quickly became more adaptive and, again in the U.S., guides to new modern ways of life, producing as a result the more fluid and open institutions of modernity. In this seminar, Block will consider the implications of the American experience for contemporary societies.

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16 November 2012
Transforming youth and child social services: a European comparison
Caroline Vink, senior expert Netherlands Youth Institute

Over the coming years the Dutch child and youth social services will be decentralised and transformed. Dutch municipalities will become responsible for all policies concerning children and young people, including child protection and mental health care. The reason behind this decentralisation is that the system is too complex and fragmented, leading to high costs and ineffective services. The demand of specialised child and youth care services also increases by approximately 10% every year. The decentralisation is not only a system change, but should also lead to a transformation in perspectives on child and youth policies. At the Netherlands Youth Institute we have studied the systems and services of many European countries to assess what lessons can be learned to shift the at risk focus to more preventive services and better outcomes for children and families.

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12 October 2012
Crossing Life’s Thresholds and Entering Liminal Space
Dr. Colette Kavanagh, cultural psychologist, published writer, and international lecturer

Life presents us with a series of threshold crossings. Paths that previously seemed safe and familiar may suddenly come to an end.  Events such as an unexpected death of a child or loved one, leaving our homeland to study or work abroad, or losing one’s job or relationship may precipitate a personal crises. There is no turning back, yet crossing the threshold of change means dealing with endings and facing new challenges.
This presentation is about the deeper meaning of life’s thresholds and their potential for personal and cultural growth.  It discusses the importance of liminality, the “in-between” transitional space where change and transformation takes place.
In addition, Colette will offer insights into Irish cultural reality and the unique way the people of her homeland deal with liminality, transition and change. 

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13 September 2012
Loss and bereavement: Children’s paintings and drawings on parental loss in the context of the HIV epidemic in Namibia
Mienke van der Brug, PhD student at the department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, VU University

In 2011-2012, Mienke van der Brug conducted fieldwork on bereavement and grief of children and adolescents orphaned in the context of HIV in northern Namibia. The children’s gallery “AKKU” in Amsterdam is currently exhibiting the paintings, drawings and linocuts that these children and adolescents made of their experiences of loss, as well as the artworks of a control group of non-orphaned children. In this presentation themes that are found during the fieldwork - such as the imagined parental support - are discussed on basis of these paintings and drawings. 

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14 May 2012
The impact of teachers’ attitudes on adolescents’ learning potential
Presentation by Emmy de Kraker-Pauw (Psychology and Education, LEARN! Institute, VU University Amsterdam)

This presentation explores the role of explicit and implicit theories of intelligence and gender in classroom interaction between teachers and adolescents. Students’ beliefs can influence their learning success and the way they deal with feedback. But what about the assessments of the students by the teachers? Do teachers’ beliefs that intelligence is a fixed entity lead to types of feedback interventions different from teachers’ who deem intelligence to be a competence that grows over time? Firstly, we study the mindset on intelligence and gender (teachers as well as students). Then we examine which types of feedback interventions teachers (Dutch and Mathematics) use during class. Thirdly, we research how the students’ assessments of their own capacities influence attention to (negative) performance feedback. It is a mixed method study in which quantitative as well as qualitative methods are used.




12 April 2012
Children’s Lived Experiences of Uganda’s Child-Centred Education
Presentation by Sarah Moorcroft (Research Master 'International Development Studies', University of Amsterdam)

Uganda has recently implemented a child-centred education reform, derived from the global education development agenda to improve the quality of education in the global South. This child-centred model is rooted in two colliding discourses in the field of education development: 1) western constructivist ideas following Piaget, Vygotsky and Dewey and 2) neoliberal economic perspectives, which look to human capital and capabilities approaches to development.
From an education ethnography completed in rural Uganda, which involves children’s perspectives and research participation, this presentation problematizes global child-centred education and the politicization of ‘the child’ in Uganda’s education system. It further reviews how the child-centred model has been recontextualized at the local level in children’s lived education experiences.

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12 March 2012
Childhood as 'self-education' and as 'disciplined freedom': Applying the capability approach to children, education and democracy
Presentation by Shanti George (independent researcher) followed by discussion.

Continuing the monthly seminar's emphasis on children as social actors and as subjects, this presentation will argue that children are not too young to be full citizens participating in democracies, in this case democracy within the home -- 'the personal is political,' when it comes to relationships between generations just as with relationships between the genders. Neither are young children too immature to have social science analysis extended to them, as the presentation will attempt to demonstrate by applying concepts of 'self education' and 'disciplined freedom' (essential to democracy) developed by Donald Schön in the context of 'reflective practitioners.' The presentation thereby disagrees with voices within the capability approach which assert that 'when dealing with children, it is the freedom that they will have in future rather than the present that should be considered' (Saito 2003). The presentation is intended to apply universally, questioning distinctions usually made between the so called Global South and Global North. 

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13 February 2012
The function of Student Pidgin in Ghana
Lecture by Laura Rupp (Faculty of Arts, VU University Amsterdam) followed by discussion.
 
In Ghana, university students speak a variety of English that has been termed Student Pidgin (especially male students). This variety exists next to other English varieties like standard (Ghanaian) English and Pidgin English. Different explanations have been put forward to explain the occurrence of Pidgin English, such as deviant “boyish” behavior and removing the pressure of speaking grammatically correct Standard English. From research that Laura Rupp conducted in September 2011 it seems that students use Student Pidgin as a “tussentaal”: that is, a variety that on the one hand clearly identifies them as educated persons while at the same time permitting them to communicate with people who cannot speak Standard English (relatives and friends at home). The researcher used a written survey and she would like to discuss with the participants of the Seminar other methodologies that could give her more insight into the function of Student Pidgin.

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16 January 2012
Young People and Social Change: Illuminating the Connections between Children/Youth Studies and Development Studies
Discussion introduced by Roy Huijsmans (Institute of Social Studies, The Hague)

To a large degree, children & youth studies and development studies constitute two separate communities of scholars with their own bodies of literature. This seminar is dedicated to a discussion on how both fields of study could find a meaningful collaboration and joint inspiration. Over the past decades the study of children and youth has attracted considerable attention across the social sciences. These researchers share a common premise in 1) conceptualising children and young people as social actors, and 2) in assessing childhood and youth as social constructs. Whilst young people have also attracted some scholarly attention in the field of development studies, it has remained a largely adult-centred domain despite the demographic realities in developing countries. On the other hand, development studies have also much to offer to children and youth studies. Development studies can draw on a significant amount of accumulated knowledge and experience on themes like agency, participation, empowerment, human rights, inequality, poverty, discourse and governmentality, themes which are currently attracting an increasing amount of critical attention in children and youth studies.

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13 December 2011
Children and youth in development work
Discussion led by Janneke Juffermans

During this seminar, the roles and perceptions of children and youth in international development were discussed. The session was chaired by Janneke Juffermans, a freelance journalist and editor of the Vice Versa magazine, and aimed to support her preparations for a special issue of Vice Versa on this topic. Vice Versa reaches 3000 readers in the development sector and explores current debates in de the sector of development cooperation.

 


15 November 2011
"Minimising Differences - Celebrating Diversity" in Danish Schools
Lecture by Ditte Strunge Sass, Brunel University, London, followed by discussion.

Ditte Sass investigates the Danish Folkeskole (The Danish ground school, age 6-16) as a space in which the child is simultaneously being a welfare citizen, as they consume a welfare good, i.e. education – and becoming a welfare citizen, as they learn appropriate ways of being a citizen in the welfare state of Denmark. More specifically this talk is about the notion of minimising differences (often perceived in socio-economic terms) and simultaneously celebrating diversity (often perceived in terms of culture). Ditte Sass will discuss how the streamlined, egalitarian school system will, in the aid of creating equal opportunities, identify characteristics, which are "not equal" and hence “right” and “wrong” ways of being diverse. Subsequently the school sometimes end up emphasising the very differences it set out to eradicate.

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10 October 2011
North African children's play and toy cultures: Recent research
Presentation by Jean-Pierre Rossie, Musée de Jouet de Moirans-en-Montagne, France, followed by discussion.

Two themes in the research of Jean-Pierre Rossie were discussed in this seminar: (1) Moroccan children’s play and toys inspired by TV programs. This concerns an interdisciplinary study (socio-cultural anthropology and communication sciences). The presenter particularly focused on the methodological and ethical aspects of the research. (2) In addition. Rossie will give a presentation on his project “research on children's play and toys in non-western or non-industrial communities and their contribution to anthropology”.

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20 September 2011
The Role of Children in the French Protection System 
Presentation by staff and students of Le Collège Coopératif Rhône-Alpes, followed by discussion. 

Staff and students of Le Collège Coopératif Rhône-Alpes (an educational center training social workers) presented their perspectives on the French system of child protection and the position of children in it. The seminar provided a platform of exchange about the value of the anthropology of children for applied work in children’s social care.

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15 April 2011
‘She treats me like I’m her own child’: A sociocultural contextualization of Ghanaian left behind children’s emotional experiences of living in a transnational family
Lecture by Miranda Poeze, PhD candidate, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, University of Maastricht, followed by discussion.

Over the past decades researchers have raised concerns over the negative impacts that parental migration has on the emotional well-being of children left behind in the home country. Most of these studies depart from a Western middle class idea of the family, which emphasizes the nuclear family and physical proximity between the parent and the child. This study moves beyond the universal and ethnocentric conceptualization of caregiving and shows that emotional experiences of Ghanaian left behind children need to be socioculturally contextualized in order to understand the dynamics leading to both negative as well as positive emotions.

Miranda Poeze is a PhD Candidate at the University of Maastricht, the Netherlands, researching Ghanaian transnational parent-child relationships and the impact of host country migration policies. She is part of the Transnational Child Raising Arrangement (TRCA) project in which Ghanaian transnational families are studied by applying mixed-methods in transnational field sites.

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15 March 2011
Childrens Drawings and Indigenous Cultures: How Mebengokre-Xikrin children from Brazil picture their culture
Lecture by Clarice Cohn, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Brazil, followed by discussion.

The Indigenization of Culture is a central topic in Anthropology. In Brazil, many Indigenous peoples are creating their own theories and translations of "culture". Children also have their perspectives on Indigenous cultures and identities. Working with Mebengokre-Xikrin children's drawings, Dr Cohn shows how they are able to picture their culture for non-Indigenous persons in school tasks, demonstrating a clear understanding of what is supposed to be "indigenous", as compared to the drawings they make for themselves, in which they draw everything that interests them be it ‘Indigenous’ or not.

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15 February 2011
Can I still become a Doctor?Matching Dutch Educational Realities with Life Dreams of ‘African Diaspora’ Children in Amsterdam Zuidoost
Lecture by Sjoukje Wartena, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Department Theory and Research in Education (VU University Amsterdam), followed by discussion.

Children in Amsterdam Zuidoost live in a spatial and ethnically segregated ‘African Diaspora’ district, with about 130 African International Churches and schools with up to hundred percent children with a migrant background. Many children are sent to the lowest -high school- educational levels and school drop-out figures are high. Children (11-13) from three primary schools participate in researching their transition to secondary education. Sjoukje Wartena will discuss her research into the challenges and opportunities of the Dutch educational system in relation to the realities of transnational families and childhood. She will also highlight some of the methodological issues faced when looking ‘through the children’s eyes’ at this field.

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17 January 2011
Challenges in Research with Children Affected by HIV/AIDS 
Lecture by Drs. Mienke van der Brug, PhD, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology (VU University Amsterdam) followed by discussion. 

Many children in Namibia are affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. They have lost one or both parents to AIDS and an increasing group of children is HIV positive. The caregivers of these
children are often reticent to speak with them about the death of parents, HIV/AIDS, anddisclosure of the child’s HIV positive status. Mienke van der Brug discussed her research with children on grief, bereavement and well-being in this context, and gave insight into her methodology envisaged during her upcoming PhD fieldwork in northern Namibia.

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30 September-1 October 2010
International Conference: 'The doors of perception: Viewing anthropology through the eyes of children'

The Anthropology of Children Working Group organised a two-day international conference during which state-of-the-art child-oriented research was presented and discussed. See the conference website for more details.




21 May 2010
Children's Rights
Lecture by Dr. Jacobijn Olthoff and Azza Abdelmoneium (Master's programme in Children's Rights, University of Amsterdam) followed by discussion. 

Children’s right gained a lot of recognition and attention in the past 20 years in academic and non-academic fields. Dr. Jacobijn Olthoff and Dr. Azza Abdelmoneium explained research from a child right perspective and elaborate on its implications and the overlaps with research approaches in other academic fields in science. Taking Sudan as a case study, the discussion focused on the challenges of research in developing countries.

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15 April 2010 
The Contours of Belonging: Legality, Race, Class and Generation in the US
Lecture by Dr. Irene Bloemraad (University of California, Berkeley), followed by discussion.

Of the more than 38 million foreign-born residents of the United States, roughly a third are naturalized US citizens, a third are legal permanent residents and a third are undocumented migrants without legal papers. The children of these people, if born in the United States, are automatically US citizens. Traditional accounts of political socialization expect that these children will learn about politics and civic engagement from their parents. But what happens when parents are immigrants, especially when their legal status prevents direct participation in the formal political system? Do children become alienated and detached from the political and larger community, or do they compensate for their parents’ lack of voice by increasing attachment and engagement? This talk presented some early findings from over 200 interviews with teenage Americans and their Mexican, Vietnamese or Chinese-origin parents living in the San Francisco Bay area. It argued that even in the United States, we can distinguish “ethnic” and “civic” notions of membership linked to being “American” or being a US citizen. Legal institutions carry important cultural implications for feelings of belonging. Group illegality influenced notions of membership, even if individuals do not confront illegality personally, while birthplace citizenship offers an opening to challenge notions of ‘being American’ predicated on race and economic privilege.

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15 March 2010
Medical Checks for Children: Searching for improvements in a universal model for children's health care
Presentation by Judith van den Hoven, AIOS General Practice & Ilse Westerbeek, Medical Checks for Children, followed by discussion.

MCC offers general medical healthcare to children in all age categories, that is from 0-18 years of age. However, preventative programs are mainly focused on children under 5 years (because of the poor survival rate under 5 years) and school children. MCC's mission is the improvement of the healthcare of underprivileged children in difficult circumstances by provision of diagnosis and treatment. Together with local contacts, MCC supplies small-scale and individual help (cure and prevention). MCC is not disease-specific orientated. MCC has a generalized approach to the total health care of the child. Through its activities MCC attempts to improve the life expectancy of underprivileged children.
Areas of help are:
• Acute assistance (5-10% of MCC’s work load).
• Prevention of disease: early detection and treatment of, for example: worm infections, malnutrition and stunted growth
• Promotion of health by giving advice on the value of sport, good nutrition, lifestyle and child rearing
• Protection of good health by giving advice on nutrition and good hygiene

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Download the PPT presentation by MCC




15 February 2010
Rethinking Program Design and Evaluation: An Education NGO’s Interest in the Anthropology of Childhood
Presentation by Simon Bailey (research manager with Aflatoun, Child Social & Financial Education), followed by discussion.  

Current children’s program planning and evaluation methodologies follow a formal logic that does not always cohere with children’s life experience. Even qualitative tools, which are meant to solicit in-depth responses, are now designed to solicit structured, usable responses from children quickly. Anthropological investigations have the potential to improve program design by taking into account the social reality in which programs are often implemented, as well as by providing richer research about how programs actually relate to what children know and how they behave.

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15 January 2010 
Developing child-oriented research methods
Presentation by Mienke van der Brug and Erik van Ommering

Conducting research with children requires a reconsideration of common, adult-centred means of data collection. Margaret Mead, already in the 1920s, gathered 32.000 'spontaneous drawings' of Manus children. Drawing has subsequently evolved into a prime methodological instrument aimed at elucidating children's perspectives. The process of drawing is believed to underline children's agency and to stimulate their ownership of the research process. However, it is still undefined how data from drawings ought to be processed, how elicitation based on drawings could best be designed and how they actually contribute to theoretical knowledge on children's lives. This seminar addressed these quandaries. During the discussion challenges were confronted and opportunities explored of child-oriented research methods, in order to set out an agenda for further development in this field. 

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10 December 2009
The Global Classroom: Introducing new arrivals, refugees, and travellers children to school settings in the United Kingdom
Lecture and workshop by Cilel Smith (Institute of Education, University of London)

Cilel Smith conducted research on the piloting and implementation of board games in UK primary schools. These games have been designed as a welcome and inclusion programme for new arrivals, refugees, and travellers children. Based on her research, she has set up a Global Classroom in which teachers are trained to use the game. Cilel Smith gave a lecture on the Global Classroom project and the contributions it made for school pupils and staff, which is followed by a demonstration.

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27 November 2009
“It’s bedtime” in the World’s Urban Middle-Classes: Children, Families, and Sleep
Guest lecture by Prof. Eyal Ben-Ari (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), followed by discussion. 

In the urban middle-class of the Euro-American societies we find a particular pre-sleep bedtime “ritual” that is (ideally) characterized by certain features: it usually takes place within the nuclear family, is centered on the private space of a bedroom, and includes a patterned set of activities centered on an evening meal, bathing, special clothing and toys, stories and lullabies, tucking or coddling the child, and then leaving the child alone in its room. In this lecture Prof. Ben-Ari examines this taken-for-granted “ritual” from three interrelated perspectives: an examination of how it is actually put into practice in Euro-American societies, a comparative investigation of the historical and cross-cultural differences in putting children to sleep, and an exploration of the manner and extent by which the scenario has been globalized.

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18 November 2009
‘Setting the agenda for the future: final episode’
Seminar to finalise the Working Group’s mission statement and discuss the agenda, fund raising, and PR activities (including website and mailing list)

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12 October 2009
‘Setting the agenda for the future’

Seminar included the presentation of a landscaping study by Anne Schouten on the anthropology of children. The draft mission statement was discussed, as well as the agenda, thematic foci of the seminars, and issues of logistics 

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16 September 2009
Cultural Models of Teaching and Learning
Lecture by Prof. David Lancy (Utah State University), followed by discussion. 

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Download the PowerPoint presentation by Prof. David Lancy

     


10 June 2009
Inaugural meeting of the Anthropology of Children Working Group

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